Double Henge Found at Bulford

| December 9, 2016 | 0 Comments

Archaeologists have found a unique double henge at Bulford, the only known example in Britain.

The double henge is within a few miles of a recently discovered ceremonial gathering place near Larkhill and Stonehenge, all the new finds were unearthed during excavations ahead of the construction of new Army Service Family Accommodation.

Items from Double Henge  at Bulford Image: WYG

Items from Double Henge at Bulford Image: WYG

The double henge at Bulford is formed by an open space enclosed by a ditch. The earliest phases were created around 2900 BC with the enclosures formed by ditches dug in segments with openings to the north. This form was altered when both were enclosed within further ditches in the Early Bronze Age (2000 BC), perhaps showing that their function changed or because they had been closed down.

From one of the Bulford henges a skull from a large dog or wolf, maybe a working companion, a trophy from the hunt, or even a totemic symbol, was recovered.

Martin Brown, Principal Archaeologist for WYG said “These discoveries are changing the way we think about prehistoric Wiltshire and about the Stonehenge landscape in particular. The Neolithic people whose monuments we are exploring shaped the world we inhabit: They were the first farmers and the first people who settled down in this landscape, setting us on the path to the modern world. It is an enormous privilege to hold their tools and investigate their lives.”

Archaeological work on both sites is being managed and directed by WYG on behalf of Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO), with fieldwork undertaken by Wessex Archaeology.

While part of the site has been investigated the majority of the monument remains undisturbed within the Larkhill Garrison.

More information: http://www.wyg.com/news-and-press-releases/new-discoveries-rewrite-stonehenge-landscape

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